In 1968, France's Jacques Tati had become an international film sensation in large part to his famous character Monsiour Hulot, a bumbling Parisian whose escapades had made the world laugh. Wanting to branch out along with expressing a serious concern of the modernization of Paris, Tati spent several years and millions of dollars to make his most expensive film yet. While the initial response was failure, it has grown to become one of Tati's most beloved films. But does the film deserve that praise or should it be lost the clutter of cubicles and office furniture? MovieDude Eric, Kent & Lobster find out.

 

If you like this episode, you can find more of Arthouse Legends on GonnaGeek.com along with other similar geek podcasts. You can also leave comments at feedback@arthouselegends.com or on our Twitter feed @arthouselegends.

Please make sure to leave feedback about the show on your podcast directory, especially on iTunes in order to help us gain more listeners. Thank you.

Direct download: AL_110.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 11:13am CDT
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In 2015, critics hailed an independent film shot entirely with an iPhone called Tangerine about a recently paroled trans woman in pursuit of her philandering boyfriend and his girlfriend over the course of Christmas Eve. But does the film live up to the critical acclaim or a descent to a pit of despair? Moviedude Eric, Kent & Lobster hit the streets to find out.

 

If you like this episode, you can find more of Arthouse Legends on GonnaGeek.com along with other similar geek podcasts. You can also leave comments at feedback@arthouselegends.com or on our Twitter feed @arthouselegends.

Please make sure to leave feedback about the show on your podcast directory, especially on iTunes in order to help us gain more listeners. Thank you.

Direct download: AL_109.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 2:30am CDT
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In 1982, Director Ridley Scott, fresh off the success of Alien, chose a film adaptation of Phillip K. Dick's "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep" to create a cyberpunk film noir called Blade Runner starring newly minted megastar Harrison Ford. The troubled production was initially praised for it's visual flair while criticizing it's slow pace and tacked-on ending. But when the "director's cut" came out during the boom of VHS, the film's stature elevated outside cult classic to a widely hailed masterpiece. But does the film genuinely deserve the praise it got both for it's theatrical and post-theatrical renditions or should it disappear like tears in the rain? Eric, Kent & Lobster strap in for a little retirement. 

 

If you like this episode, you can find more of Arthouse Legends on GonnaGeek.com along with other similar geek podcasts. You can also leave comments at feedback@arthouselegends.com or on our Twitter feed @arthouselegends.

Please make sure to leave feedback about the show on your podcast directory, especially on iTunes in order to help us gain more listeners. Thank you.

Direct download: AL_108.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 4:29am CDT
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In 1957, Swedish Filmmaker released The Seventh Seal into international theaters and became an instant icon of European cinema. The film about a knight and his squire traversing a Black Plague-riddled Sweden while playing a fate-deciding game of chess created countless knockoff and would provide some of the longest-lasting images ever put to film. But does the film deserve a pass or should it be taken away in a dance of despair? Eric, Kent & Lobster find out.

Direct download: AL_107.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 1:55pm CDT
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