In 1972, young film school wunderkind Francis Ford Coppola assembled one of the finest casts ever to create an epic about a crime family as it transitions from one generation to another. This film's status has been cemented by both it's powerful moments and quotable dialogue and places high nearly every list of great films. But does it deserve the gun or the cannoli? Eric, Kent & Lobster are proud to present this as the season finale of Arthouse Legends.

 

If you like this episode, you can find more of Arthouse Legends on GonnaGeek.com along with other similar geek podcasts. You can also leave comments at feedback@arthouselegends.com or on our Twitter feed @arthouselegends.

Please make sure to leave feedback about the show on your podcast directory, especially on iTunes in order to help us gain more listeners. Thank you.

Direct download: AL_23.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 10:00am CDT
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After a horrific stint in Hollywood, French filmmaker Jean Pierre Jeunet returned to Paris to get back to what he did best. For his next project, he tapped up-and-coming international actress Audrey Tautou to play his most fascinating character yet, an innocent young woman with a deep imagination and a newfound love of meddling in the lives of her friends and neighbors. What transpired was an international hit that cemented the status of both the actress and the filmmaker. But does Amelie still hold up as a dream or should it burst into a puddle of obscurity? Eric, Kent & Lobster head to Paris and find out for themselves.

 

If you like this episode, you can find more of Arthouse Legends on GonnaGeek.com along with other similar geek podcasts. You can also leave comments at feedback@arthouselegends.com or on our Twitter feed @arthouselegends.

Please make sure to leave feedback about the show on your podcast directory, especially on iTunes in order to help us gain more listeners. Thank you.

Direct download: AL_22.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 10:00am CDT
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Anyone who ever brings up the subject of movies know I’m a geek. I don’t just talk about how awesome a movie is, I discuss scenes, actors, photography, editing, writing and the occasional dolly grip work. I can see 2 seconds of a film and in most cases tell you what movie it is if I’ve seen it before and on occasion even if I haven’t. I watch action, sci-fi, fantasy, comedy and horror along with drama, foreign (and not just Asian), classic and even experimental. I enjoy bad movies if they’re fun, I LOVE great movies even when no one can understand why. And I’m not alone.

Film geeks, like most of geekdom, are misunderstood. We are either seen as those people who worship at the altar of Spielberg and Jackson and love anything mainstream, especially in the sci-fi/fantasy/horror genres. Or we are seen as those stuck up snobs who require their movies to be obscure and brooding. Every film must have meaning, usually on concepts of death and/or misery. And there are those who are like that and have every right to enjoy those kinds of films specifically. But most film geeks can easily enjoy both the popcorn flick AND the more serious, themed fare. We can watch classic F.W. Murnau silent films, then jump into a Peter Jackson saga. Film geeks love various entertainments.

Yet many geeks seem to dismiss classic and art house movies in a way that is rather disappointing. They expect either state-of-the-art filmmaking or a nostalgia that brings them back to the wonder of their childhoods. They refuse to look further and see a wide array of worlds that are out there. Familiarity is always the enemy of innovation and refusing to look at the past means to ignore things that might be prevalent in the present. Take Network, a film about the dumbing down of news in order to appease the masses want for distraction. Sound familiar? Or 2001: A Space Odyssey, a film that not only created the template for science fiction films ever since, but has challenged audiences with its non-expository storytelling.

Geeks also need to understand that many of their favorite genres were originally art house (niche) fare, especially in the case of science fiction. Most studios found that such films and shows were only meant to indulge the fantasies of young boys (sorry ladies, they didn’t even think about you back then). Most science fiction movies were made of shoestring budgets meant only to be seen on screens targeted to that demographic (mainly the drive-in theaters).  Even now, the horror genre thrives due to its constant need for innovation to create new scares on very limited resources, which is why many of Hollywood’s A-list filmmakers came from such genres.

One of the things that I have heard from self-proclaimed geeks when it comes to independent and classic film is that they don’t want to be bored by lifeless, self-important storytelling that gives absolutely no entertainment. This is a valid argument because for every good film, there are a ton of bad ones (check your local Redbox if you do not believe me). But that’s not always the case. In fact, films like Oldboy, Pulp Fiction, even 2001 required that people take a leap of faith and watch something completely original and be able to spread word of mouth to become as recognized as they were. Mainstream movies don’t need nearly as much due to the constant marketing required to get interest involved. If you’re not certain that something is for you, watch a trailer, read a synopsis, or simply find someone you trust and ask them.

Geeks, by definition, should be about discovering the new and appreciating both the good and the bad, and not just film geeks. Geekdom is and should always be about appreciating the variety that life gives. There have been over 100 years of films, some that are not as appreciated as they should because of their age. Buster Keaton’s comedy is on par if not more spectacular than Jackie Chan (fact: Chan’s inspiration comes from Keaton). Ernst Lubitsch’s comedies are some of the wittiest and sometimes sexiest films ever made. If you don’t believe me, watch Trouble in Paradise. If you thought The Thing was awesome, watch the original It Came From Outer Space. If you want something disturbing, check out Michael Hanneke’s Funny Games (not the American version). If you want to see something uplifting and genuinely happy, try My Life As A Dog or Amelie. 

I started Arthouse Legends wanting to not only talk about movies that mainstream geeks might not know about, but to stir conversations about these films and others, to open minds to new possibilities and to show that these old or indie films are not simply for the snobs or the chic. That we can talk about them and love or hate these films on their merits and not what others deem them to be. If I have encouraged one person to try a new film, even one I personally don’t like, then I consider the aims of the podcast a success. I am a geek trying to talk to my fellow geeks, hoping you see that art house and classic films are as much geek as giant battling robots and space ships. They take us on a different journey, yet equally as exciting. And I hope you can join us in the conversation.

Category:Commentary -- posted at: 11:30pm CDT
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In 1976, New Hollywood directors have firmly taken over American screens with their evelope-pushing themes and unique characters. One of it's brightest stars, Martin Scorsese, along with screenwriter Paul Schrader and star Robert DeNiro created it's most controversial antihero yet; a Vietnam Vet turned taxi driver who may or may not be losing his sanity. This film made many careers, but does it earn it's fare? Eric, Kent & Lobster hop in to find out.

 

If you like this episode, you can find more of Arthouse Legends on GonnaGeek.com along with other similar geek podcasts. You can also leave comments at feedback@arthouselegends.com or on our Twitter feed @arthouselegends.

Please make sure to leave feedback about the show on your podcast directory, especially on iTunes in order to help us gain more listeners. Thank you.

Direct download: AL_21.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 1:41am CDT
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During the 70s, the biggest name in comedy was Python, a troupe out of England whose slapstick insanity mixed with crude brilliance became an influence worldwide. After the breakout success of their first feature, they prepared for their most ambitious project ever; a comedy set in the Holy Land in the time of Jesus starring the child who was born one manger down from, now grown into the put-upon sad sack named Brian. With jokes that tackle religous zealotry, blind faith and the proper way to write "Romans Go Home", this film made enemies very quickly. But does Eric, Kent and Lobster join that crowd or do they look on the bright side of life?

 

If you like this episode, you can find more of Arthouse Legends on GonnaGeek.com along with other similar geek podcasts. You can also leave comments at feedback@arthouselegends.com or on our Twitter feed @arthouselegends.

Please make sure to leave feedback about the show on your podcast directory, especially on iTunes in order to help us gain more listeners. Thank you.

Direct download: AL_20.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 9:00am CDT
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In 1973, 22-year-old documentary filmmaker Barbara Kopple arrived in Harlan, Kentucky to document a coal miner strike that was tied to a film she was working on regarding coal mining unions. What she saw there and for the next year would change the subject of her film and the course of her work. From the picket lines to the kitchen tables, she collected stories and events that would culminate into the definitive vision of labor battles in blue collar America. But which side will Eric, Kent and Lobster be on when they discuss this controversial Oscar winner?

Direct download: AL_19.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 8:39pm CDT
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